What Being Vaccinated for COVID-19 Can Do For You

Woman showing her arm after getting vaccine

The information around COVID-19 vaccinations can be difficult to keep up with. At YourTown Health, we want to help you cut through the noise. 

Though myths about the vaccine, and potential side effects may give you pause, there’s plenty of silver in this cloudy lining. We are passionate partners in protecting your family and your health. That’s why we want to share our good news about being vaccinated with you. 

Living a (Mostly) Mask-Free Life

On May 13, President Biden declared that the CDC no longer recommends mask-wearing — inside or outside — for those who have been vaccinated. Whether you receive the Moderna, Pfizer, or Johson & Johnson vaccines, once your body has produced antibodies and you are past the window of post-vaccine safety (generally two weeks after your final shot), you can feel more confident moving through life without a mask. 

Of course, many places of business are still requesting mask-wearing, because not everyone is vaccinated, and companies need to protect their staff. Prevention also points out that, while vaccines protect you extremely well, there’s still a small chance of infection. So, a little extra precaution in large groups is advised.

But in general, “If you are fully vaccinated,” the CDC asserts, “you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic.”

Harvard Health further spells out what’s safe for vaccinated individuals, with and without masks.  “Mixing two or more households that have people who aren’t yet vaccinated raises the risk for getting the virus that causes COVID-19 for anyone who isn’t vaccinated,” they warn. This means the more people who are vaccinated, the fewer masks you may have to wear. 

Leaving on a Jet Plane

For many, travel has been a big absence during the COVID-19 pandemic. But if you are vaccinated, travel may now be less of a concern. “Studies analyzing vaccinated people in the real world show that not only are breakthrough COVID-19 cases rare,” assures ScienceNews,  “ . . . they also lessen the chances of severe disease.”

The Mayo Clinic also carefully spells out how the vaccine protects you and others from any potential exposure. 

Regular precautions such as mask-wearing, handwashing, and distancing when surrounded by others not in your household remain smart tactics, especially when traveling. But in 2020, CNN reported the likelihood of catching COVID-19 on a plane and based on this newer vaccine research, you may feel even safer. 

Gimme A Hug (Or Kiss!) 

The risk of transmission through contact decreases as more and more of you are vaccinated. This means that if you are vaccinated, and your son is vaccinated, and your grandma or dad is also vaccinated, you are all safer from the virus when you have that group hug or indoor lunch.

As Paul Pottinger, MD, an infectious disease doctor at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle told Everyday Health on April 28, 2021, “Hugs between two people are fine provided everyone is feeling well and is immunized.” 

A Sigh of Relief

In general, being vaccinated may reduce your level of emotional stress.

“I feel safer knowing that I’ve gotten both vaccinations,” nurse Diana DiMarcantonio Kott wrote for CNBC in February 2021. Though initial uncertainty about the vaccine may give you brief pause, the general sense of safety and well-being after receiving this medical protection could be worth even more. 

As Lynn Zakeri, a licensed clinical social worker in Skokie, Illinois told HuffPost after receiving her vaccine, “It’s very relieving — I like that everyone I know is going to feel the way I do.”

Do you have more questions or concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine and how it will protect you and your family? We’re here to help. Visit our website to contact us for more information, or call us at 770-463-4644.